I am often asked whether I am primarily a novelist or a philosopher. The answer is: both. In a certain sense, every novelist is a philosopher, because one cannot present a picture of human existence without a philosophical framework. . . . In order to define, explain and present my concept of man, I had to become a philosopher in the specific meaning of the term.

Ayn Rand, “Preface,”
For the New Intellectual

Owner: Leonard Peikoff  |  Credit: Ayn Rand Archives

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The Ayn Rand Archives is a corporate repository maintained by the Ayn Rand Institute. Our collections feature the Ayn Rand Papers as well as material in all media, which document Ayn Rand’s intellectual development and cultural impact.

 

Our holdings form the most comprehensive grouping of Ayn Rand material in the world. Serious researchers from across the critical spectrum are welcome to apply for access privileges.

 

Access is extended to scholars, general writers, journalists, and university students. High school students are also welcome and should obtain a letter of sponsorship from a supervising teacher or school official.

 

Access privileges are granted at the discretion of the Ayn Rand Institute. A reference interview and signed researcher agreement is required of all scholars.

 

Questions? An FAQ is provided below. For general inquiries or reference questions, please write to us at archives@aynrand.org.

 
From the Ayn Rand Archives

Ayn Rand and Her Two Sisters

 

Resources

  • Ayn Rand Archives | Ayn Rand Institute

    Collections

    The Ayn Rand Archives contains items that reflect the scope of Ayn Rand’s life, work, and influence. These include originals and facsimiles of her papers, as well as digital downloads.

    Explore our Collections
  • Ayn Rand Archives | Ayn Rand Institute

    Exhibits

    Our collections contribute items to many exhibits: locally, nationally, and even internationally. These exhibits celebrate particular works or place Ayn Rand within a larger context.

    Enter the Exhibits
  • Ayn Rand Archives | Ayn Rand Institute

    Reference Library

    We maintain a diverse collection of books, periodicals, and other items that mention Ayn Rand or Objectivism. These items are available for check out/Interlibrary Loan via LibraryThing.

    Browse our Books
  • Ayn Rand Archives | Ayn Rand Institute

    Legacy Library

    We've worked to reassemble Ayn Rand's personal library as it was at the time of her death. Curious about what titles she'd read or owned? You can take a peek here.

    View her Library
  • Ayn Rand Archives | Ayn Rand Institute

    Oral History

    Our oral history project gathers information about Ayn Rand and the history of the Objectivist movement. So far, we’ve conducted over 200 interviews.

    Tell us Your Story
  • Ayn Rand Archives | Ayn Rand Institute

    Published Works

    Hundreds of books and articles have incorporated materials available at the Ayn Rand Archives. We've put together a list that will be updated regularly.

    Review the Works

FAQ

  • What is the Ayn Rand Archives?

    Established in 1995, the Ayn Rand Archives is a corporate repository maintained by the Ayn Rand Institute. In 1992 the Estate of Ayn Rand donated a portion of the Ayn Rand Papers to the Library of Congress. In 1995, the Estate placed the remaining papers with the Ayn Rand Institute, to which it is gradually transferring ownership.

  • What are the collecting goals of the Ayn Rand Archives?

    In addition to housing the Ayn Rand Papers (which occupy 150 linear feet), the Ayn Rand Archives collects material in all media by and about Ayn Rand and her influence—including institutional records, personal papers, A/V collections, personal libraries, artworks, furniture, and realia.

  • Who can use the Ayn Rand Archives?

    Serious academic and independent scholars, including journalists as well as college students are encouraged to apply for research privileges. High school students are also welcome to apply and should obtain a letter of sponsorship from a supervising teacher or school official.

  • Do I need to be an Objectivist to use the Ayn Rand Archives?

    No, agreement with Ayn Rand’s philosophy is not a condition of access. Since 2000, more than sixty scholars and researchers from across the critical spectrum have used the resources in the Ayn Rand Archives.

  • How can I apply for research access to the Ayn Rand Archives?

    Prospective researchers may send inquiries to archives@aynrand.org; please include a description of your project and its scope. Access privileges are granted at the discretion of the Ayn Rand Institute. A reference interview and signed researcher agreement are required of all first-time users.

  • Are finding aids available?

    Findings aids at varying levels of description are available for researchers. Requests to examine unprocessed materials or materials requiring special handling are considered on a case-by-case basis.

  • Do you have a reading room with regular hours?

    Yes. Our reading room offers a reference collection that includes a facsimile of the Ayn Rand Papers held in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress, English and foreign editions of Rand’s works, and secondary literature. Reading room hours are Monday through Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., by appointment.

  • Can I access material online?

    Yes, digital access to the Ayn Rand Papers and other collections is available on a limited basis.

  • Does the Ayn Rand Archives loan materials for exhibits?

    The Ayn Rand Archives has contributed objects to museum and online exhibitions around the world. Institutions seeking to incorporate objects from our collections into their exhibits are welcome to contact us at archives@aynrand.org.

  • What is the nature of Estate-edited texts based on materials in the Ayn Rand Archives?

    Since 1984 the Estate of Ayn Rand has prepared numerous anthologies based on materials from the Ayn Rand Papers and other collections. These works were edited for the general reader, according to standards set forth in their introductions. Scholars wishing to explore the underlying originals may do so at the Ayn Rand Archives.

  • How can I donate materials?

    The Ayn Rand Archives welcomes donations of enduring historical value. Prospective donors of personal papers, corporate records, A/V materials, and realia are encouraged to contact us at archives@aynrand.org.

  • How can I volunteer?

    The Ayn Rand Archives welcomes volunteers! Opportunities are available either on-site or off-site, and include (but are not limited to) research and transcription projects. For further details, please contact us at archives@aynrand.org.